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Sunday, July 22
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

ALL-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting (sponsored by Thomson Reuters)

There is no charge for this ticketed event, but advance registration by June 29 is required.

Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Republic Ballroom B

7:00am

7:00am

SCCLL-SIS Breakfast, Business Meeting and Silent Auction (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Ticketed event: $30.00; advance registration required by June 29.

Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom West

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.

Sunday July 22, 2012 7:00am - 11:59pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

8:45am

Opening General Session/Keynote Speaker (sponsored by Bloomberg Law/Bloomberg BNA, LexisNexis and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business)

This session will be webcast from Boston on AALL2go (member login required).

Tomorrow's Legal Marketplace

 

What future role will lawyers and legal information professionals play in an IT-based information society? Suggesting that the global recession has brought about an irreversible change to the legal market – one that will define the next decade of legal service – Richard Susskind will explain why and how some (but not all) legal services will become commoditized. Susskind will introduce two concepts – decomposing and multi-sourcing – that he believes will underpin the work of tomorrow’s lawyers. He will then explore the role that information technology and the internet will play in transforming legal service, improving our courts, and improving access to justice. Susskind argues that these transformations present a fundamental challenge for everyone who works in the legal marketplace.  Tomorrow’s legal marketplace will be very different from today’s, leading Susskind to pose two questions: 1) What are we training our young lawyers to become? and 2) What jobs will there be for legal professionals in the future? In answering this last question, Susskind will outline a series of exciting  new job opportunities for legal information professionals.

 

Professor Richard Susskind, OBE, is an author, speaker, and independent adviser to major professional firms, in-house legal departments, and national governments. His main area of expertise is the future of legal service, with particular reference to information technology. Since 1988, he has been IT Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice of England of Wales. He is President of the Society for Computers and Law and Chair of the Advisory Board of the Oxford University Internet Institute. He holds professorships at Oxford University; University College, London; Gresham College, London; and the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.  Richard lectures internationally and has been invited to speak in more than 40 countries and has addressed audiences (in person and electronically), numbering more than 250,000. He has written and edited numerous books, including Expert Systems in Law (OUP, 1987), The Future of Law (OUP, 1996), Transforming the Law (OUP, 2000), The End of Lawyers? (OUP, 2008), Tomorrow’s Lawyers (OUP, forthcoming). He has written well over 100 columns for The Times, and his work has been translated into 10 languages. Richard has a law degree from the University of Glasgow and a doctorate in law and computers from Balliol College, Oxford. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the British Computer Society, and was awarded an OBE in the Millennium New Year's Honours List for services to IT in the Law and to the Administration of Justice.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 8:45am - 10:15am
HCC-Ballroom

9:00am

Daily Paper-The Hub

The Hub, AALL’s daily conference paper, will help keep you informed during the 2012 Annual Meeting. Published for the four days of the conference (Saturday–Tuesday) in print—plus two electronic editions—it will feature articles of interest to those attending the meeting, including program and meeting announcements, articles about featured speakers, and helpful advice from selected librarians from around the country. Also featured will be information about the Boston area, including articles on historical sites, cultural events, tours, and dining.

Be sure to check our blog The Hub-Bub regularly, too, for news and updates about conference happenings in our host city.

Interested persons wishing to submit articles or other information to the Hub should send them to Joan Shear at Boston College Law Library.

• Articles for the electronic preview edition must be received by June 7.
• Articles for the first print edition must be received by July 9.
• Onsite, the deadline is 1:00 p.m. for the next day's edition.

Sunday July 22, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 209

9:00am

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services

Sunday July 22, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-The Fens

10:00am

10:45am

A1: Patriot Practice: Programs to Assist Service Members and Veterans

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in providing services to military members and veterans

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to articulate anecdotal and statistical indicators of the need for legal assistance for military service members and veterans.
2) Participants will be able to summarize three means of support that law librarians can provide to address the needs of service members and veterans.

While a growing number of service members are returning home, many of those still deployed abroad continue to serve despite intensifying legal issues at home. Additionally, because of the increasing number of veterans returning home with medical and other significant needs, veterans are finding it more difficult to successfully assert claims for medical and other types of assistance. Further, criminal courts are seeing an increasing number of cases involving veterans. The American Bar Association, state bar associations, and academic institutions are implementing programs to provide legal assistance to service members and veterans. This program will attempt to describe the scope of the need and familiarize participants with some of the program initiatives and resources designed to help address the legal needs of service members and veterans. The panel members will also discuss how law librarians can support these programs.

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 210

10:45am

A2: The National Declassification Center – Will It Meet Our Expectations?

Target Audience: Law librarians from all types of libraries whose patrons need access to declassified records for their research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify five challenges related to the federal government’s declassification policy and assess the effectiveness of the National Declassification Center in addressing these challenges.
2) Participants will be able to list effective strategies for locating and making use of newly declassified records to benefit their library users and contribute to a more open government.

The National Declassification Center (NDC), established by Executive Order in late 2009, has the vital task of preparing a revised backlog of approximately 385 million pages for public release by December 31, 2013. Many of these records are of great interest to legal researchers. NDC Director Sheryl Jasielum Shenberger will discuss the progress the NDC has made in addressing this growing backlog and prioritizing records for release, as well as the challenges that remain. Nate Jones, FOIA Coordinator for the National Security Archive, will assess the progress that the NDC has made from an outsider’s perspective, and Catherine Dunn, Government Relations Committee Chair and moderator of this session, will outline the sources available for accessing declassified documents and discuss how researchers can use them effectively.

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 306

10:45am

A3: Guerrilla Usability Testing

Target Audience: Librarians interested in improving their services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify problems users have working with web-based interfaces.
2) Participants will be able to implement a cost-effective usability program.

How can you design systems that work efficiently, while avoiding common problems? Enter usability testing, a process to observe user interaction with a system intended to discover and fix problems. Contrary to popular belief, usability testing need not be expensive or even overly time consuming. This program will demonstrate different types of usability testing, including sophisticated software tools and low-tech solutions; discuss the “test early and often” model of usability testing; and show how to budget time and money for a successful usability testing program. Participants will also see a live usability test conducted during this program.

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 302

10:45am

A4: E-stats Collection for Your Non-Stacks Collection

Target Audience: Reference and acquisitions librarians, electronic services librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will become knowledgeable about usage statistics and how to gather them.
2) Participants will have the ability to analyze third-party aggregators and ERM integration.

Library analytics have become more important than ever in the electronic era. As budgets tighten and students demand more online resources, evaluating usage of such resources becomes a key issue in allocating expense funds. Statistical analysis is one way to determine whether a library is getting its best bang for the buck. However, obtaining and analyzing such statistics can be a scattered and challenging process. Speakers will discuss the ways libraries obtain patron usage statistics with a central focus on electronic resources. Participants will see demonstrations of third-party statistical gathering software, as well as learn how to gain access to statistics held and distributed directly by vendors. An overview of COUNTER and SUSHI compliance will also be presented.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Ian Connor

Ian Connor

Senior Director of Engineering | | Copyright Clearance Center | | | | Pubget, a wholly owned subsidiary of Copyright Clearance Center Inc, is the premier provider of search and documents in the sciences. Learn how our advertising programs, enterprise solutions, and library solutions can help you make more money and be more efficient. | | | | Pubget PaperStats securely tracks COUNTER-compliant usage statistics, so you—or your staff—don't have to. Pubget helps you...
Read More →
avatar for Sujay Darji

Sujay Darji

Product Manager, Swets
I am a Product Manager at Swets for North and South America. I have a strong interest in content usage and the tools we have developed to help assisting in selection management. | | | | Outside of Swets I have many hobbies that include Hockey, Fishing, Computer gaming, Motorcycles among other miscellaneous items when I am able to scrounge up some time. I am have been happily married to my wonderful wife Michelle since November of 2011 and currently reside in Erial, NJ.

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 304

10:45am

A5: Be Memorable: Library Advocacy Through Compelling Storytelling

Target Audience: All librarians who are interested in developing strong advocacy skills

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify the elements of an effective, purposeful story and will be able to create such stories.
2) Participants will be able to incorporate storytelling within their advocacy efforts.

Whether persuading an administrator within your institution or lobbying for external action, storytelling can be a powerful and compelling advocacy tool. Telling stories about real people and real challenges is an effective means for convincing others of your viewpoint. What makes a good story? How can you incorporate the elements of storytelling into your advocacy efforts? After learning the fundamentals of a persuasive story and how to successfully integrate the story within a strategic advocacy campaign, participants will have the opportunity to practice their newly acquired skills in small groups. Volunteers from the small groups will share their story drafts with the larger audience and receive constructive feedback.

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 312

10:45am

A6: The New FDLP: A Collaborative Future for Government Information

Target Audience: Public services staff in all types of law libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will gain a better understanding of the future of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) in a digital world.
2) Participants will learn what options are available as libraries collaborate to provide regional FDLP sites (services).

This program will examine the future of the Federal Depository Library Program, now that the old print model of distribution is largely a thing of the past. How is the Government Printing Office adjusting to the new world of digital information?

Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 311

10:45am

FCIL-SIS Program: Teaching Foreign and International Law Interest Group Presents, "Teaching FCIL Topics Roundtable"

Target Audience: Librarians who teach in law schools or train lawyers in law firms

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify effective strategies for teaching research on foreign legal databases.
2) Participants will discuss pedagogical techniques that help digital generation students learn.

Come take advantage of an opportunity to share your experiences and learn about new techniques used in teaching foreign, comparative, and international legal research courses. Breakout sessions are planned based on audience interests and institutions.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom East

10:45am

PLL-SIS Program: Bloom Where You’re Planted: Finding Contentment at Work

Target Audience: All librarians, regardless of library type

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will gain new insights into how to be content in situations that can be difficult.

2) Participants will learn strategies and techniques for relaxation and making the best of difficult work situations.

Everyone – even those who love the work they do – can have difficult work situations.  This may be a temporary situation, or it may be something that is long-term and beyond your control.  Instead of quitting or getting stressed and angry, come to this session and learn strategies for coping with challenging situations.  You will also have the opportunity to participate in a facilitated relaxation exercise and share your own strategies with colleagues during the discussion portion of the program.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 202

10:45am

RIPS-SIS Program: Medical Marijuana: A Growing Concern?

Target Audience: Researchers interested in gaining an understanding of the complicated and controversial laws governing medical marijuana

Learning outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify sources of law governing the access to and growth of medical marijuana.
2) Participants will be able to help their patrons weed through the legal issues surrounding medical marijuana.

The legalities of medical marijuana is a fascinating example of state and federal laws at war. Although 15 states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes, the drug remains a banned substance under federal law, raising issues of Congress's pre-emption authority under the Supremacy clause. To further befuddle researchers, state laws often involve a complicated quagmire of referenda, statutes, regulations, ordinances, and judicial opinions. This program delves into the conflict between the federal government’s enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act, and state and local laws underscoring the therapeutic benefits of cannabis. The speakers will also address practical concerns surrounding lawful access to medical marijuana. Whether the medicinal use of marijuana is ultimately slated for eradication, or achieves legalization, this presentation will challenge you to take a fresh look at this complex and rapidly changing area of law.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 205

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

PLL-SIS Annual Business Meeting Luncheon (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Ticketed event: $10.00; advance registration required by June 29.

Sunday July 22, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Constitution Ballroom

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

LHRB-SIS Program: Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest Presentation

Target Audience: Librarians interested in legal history

 

Learning Outcomes

1) Participants will be able to identify three professional needs of 19th-century American legal practitioners.
2) Participants will be able to discuss how the content of an early legal journal empirically reflects and addresses historical legal professional interests and needs.

 

Zoey Orol will present "Reading the Early American Legal Profession:  A Study of the First American Law Review."  Orol is the second-place winner of the 2012 Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest and a 2L student at New York University School of Law.  John Beerbower, a 3L student at the University of Virginia School of Law, wrote the first-place essay.  His essay, "Ex Parte McCardle and the Attorney General's Duty to Defend Acts of Congress," examines key historical antecedents of Attorneys General refusals to defend a statute or appear on behalf of the United States in cases before the Supreme Court.  (Beerbower is unable to attend the AALL Annual Meeting.)  These excellent papers demonstrate the continuing importance of historical research to understanding the foundations and development of legal theory and practice.  The LHRB-SIS annual essay contest is named in honor of Morris L. Cohen, former Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School, whose scholarly work was in the fields of legal research, rare books, and historical bibliography.  The purpose of the contest is to encourage scholarship in the areas of legal history, rare law books, and legal archives, as well as to acquaint students with the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and law librarianship.  Additional information on the Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest is available on the LHRB SIS website.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 203

1:15pm

B1: The New Generation of Legal Research Databases: 2012 Boston Sequel

Target Audience: Anyone who uses multiple online legal research vendors in their normal workflow

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to assess the advantages and disadvantages of newer generation vendor engines over classic versions of Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw.
2) Participants will be able to discuss how the adoption of these new versions of standard research tools affects the education of end users and workflows in libraries.

What began as a lively discussion of WestlawNext last year in Philadelphia continues with this sequel program. This forum will enable librarians familiar with Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis Advance, and WestlawNext to compare the developments of these research tools and consider the effect these changes have had in libraries. The discussion will contrast the latest interfaces of these services to their classic versions, as well as to each other. What worked? What failed? Have these “improvements” changed the workflow at your institution or company? Did these changes impact user preference? And, how can vendors improve future product generations? Practical matters – such as implementation, user education, accuracy of results, document sharing, billing practices, and user satisfaction – will dominate the discussion.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Emily Marcum

Emily Marcum

I'm a law firm librarian from Birmingham, Alabama. Our firm has 61 attorneys.
VJ

Victoria J. Szymczak

Law Library Director, Associate Professor of Law, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 302

1:15pm

B2: Finding the Future: Position Your Organization for Long-Term Viability

Target Audience: Law librarians in all organizations who are asked to provide strategic information for their own or parent organization

Learning Outcomes:
1) Law librarians in all organizations will be able to immediately use the information presented to enhance the strategic knowledge-base of their own or parent organization, and thereby, make a measurable contribution to the future.
2) Participants will be introduced to the basics of two, strategically focused skills – environmental scanning and trend analysis – to augment their own professional skill set.

Environmental scanning and trend analysis are two techniques that are used regularly in any number of settings to help organizations plan for and position themselves for the future. Law firms might use these techniques to anticipate client demand for their services. Law schools may need to prepare for curricula changes. Governmental bodies may be faced with regulatory or reporting requirements. All libraries are constantly challenged to anticipate changes in collections, services, staffing, and technology. By providing actual examples and demonstrating the use of proven techniques, this program will show how law firms, law schools, and government libraries can leverage environmental scanning and trend analysis to position their parent organizations, and themselves, for long-term viability. Drawing upon their own expertise and experience, the panelists will individually describe their own findings and methodologies, and then engage the audience in a discussion of best practices and information-gathering techniques that are common to the kinds of organizations represented and have contributed to organizations’ strategic decision-making.

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 304

1:15pm

B3: Digital Content: The What, the How, and the Where

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in planning and conducting a digitization project

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to create a digitization policy for their libraries.
2) Participants will learn how to identify sources of costs in projects and in archiving digital content, considering in-house or outsourcing options.

This program will cover the basics of creating digital products, including best practices, specifications, metadata, workflow, quality control and assessment, and vendor relations. Additionally, participants will learn how to manage digital content, including making the content available for users, assessing user needs, ingest of content, access issues for digital content management, preservation options, and digital repositories. This program is co-sponsored by the Legal Information Preservation Alliance (LIPA).

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 210

1:15pm

B4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law – Part I

Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze a research problem in terms of the legal system, the human rights issue, and the appropriate treaty.
2) Participants will be able to identify and apply the knowledge of the appropriate institutional source; the stage in the institution’s process at which the relevant information/document is likely to be found; and the type of document that is most likely to have the information needed to solve the problem.

Part I of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to research difficult problems in the United Nations Charter-based and treaty-based bodies. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the treaties; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the Charter and the treaties; and the unique documents produced by those institutions. Participants will return to their institutions able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 312

1:15pm

B5: How Fair Is It? Understanding the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010

Target Audience: Information professionals in law schools, government libraries, prison libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to track the history of the Anti-Abuse Act of 1986, which created the disparity between U.S. federal criminal penalties for crack cocaine and powder cocaine, to the recently passed Fair Sentencing Act of 2010, which reduces that disparity.
2) Participants will be able to analyze the potential impact that the new legislation is expected to have in predominately low-income, African-American communities.

Since the late 1980s, increasingly more severe sentencing has been applied to the possession or distribution of crack cocaine, which is more often associated with low-income, African-American communities. However, while African-American defendants account for roughly 80 percent of those arrested and jailed for crack-related offenses, public health data reveals that two-thirds of crack cocaine users are more likely to be white or Hispanic. For a first-time trafficking offense involving five grams or more of crack cocaine, or 500 grams or more of powder cocaine, the statutory penalty range was five to 40 years of imprisonment. The Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 set out to reduce the racial disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. Attendees will discover the motivation behind the original legislation that created the sentencing disparity and the implications of the new legislation for low-income, African-American communities.

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 306

1:15pm

B6: Finding Your Inner Nancy Drew: Public Records Resources Online

Target Audience: Reference librarians in all libraries who need to research people or companies

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and utilize the best and most cost-effective online resources for their public records research.
2) Participants will be prepared to analyze and evaluate public records databases and their content.

Looking for information on a person or company? This program will cover sites and strategies useful in public records research. Participants will learn creative ways to use (mostly) free web sites to find location and real property data, birth/death and marriage/divorce records, company affiliations, professional licenses, court records, and more. Additional discussion will cover public records databases and how to critically evaluate the information. The speakers each have more than a decade of experience in conducting research on people and companies, and will provide concrete examples and strategies used in their work.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 311

1:15pm

OBS-SIS Program: Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire? The New Game Show for Law Librarians

Target Audience: Librarians, especially those in public service or reference arenas, who get confused by all the acronyms that have arisen in the library world – notably in the area of technology

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify different technologies by their acronyms and will leave knowing more acronyms than they knew before.
2) Participants will be able to more readily recognize and explain the meaning of various library and library technology-related acronyms.

FRSAD? RDA? FRAD? BSR? NACO? Acronyms are everywhere in our profession. New ones arrive all the time, and you are supposed to know what they mean. Are you an "Acronym Whiz," or do you go running whenever they appear? Well, here’s your chance to test your mettle by participating in this new game – "Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire?!" Not good at playing games? No problem! Simply sit in our audience and cheer for your favorite contestant. Everyone gets a prize -- becoming an expert on what all those acronyms mean. Then when you return to work, you can host your very own, “Who Wants to Be an Acronymaire?!”

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 206

1:15pm

PLL-SIS Program: Driving Utilization and Firm Profitability Through Resource Customization

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who want information on utilizing technology to integrate resources into their online portal

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn the different types of technology available for integrating resources and offering customized services within their online environment.
2) Participants will be able to create a strategy for increasing resource utilization and firm profitability through portal and dashboard enhancements.

This program will highlight the types of technology and resources that law librarians and knowledge professionals use to provide access to internal and external information that directly aligns with their firm’s strategic initiatives. The presenters will discuss application programming interfaces (APIs), custom user interfaces (CUIs), widgets, dashboards, and other technology currently available in the legal market. Also, see how both law firm libraries and knowledge management departments are embracing SharePoint and other software to create more customization. Learn how you can offer customized access points to content that will drive resource utilization and deliver value to your firm in new and innovative ways.

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:15pm - 2:45pm
HCC-Room 207

1:30pm

TS-SIS Program: Creating Legal Subject Headings

Target Audience: Librarians who want to improve Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), but do not know how

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to complete a subject heading proposal form accurately.
2) Participants will know the criteria used in evaluating Subject Authority Cooperative Program (SACO) heading proposals.


The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) will grow and evolve only if librarians take an active role in its curation. Through hands-on practice, participants will work together to conceive, compose, evaluate, and submit a draft proposal for SACO of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC), the editorial body that ultimately adds and changes terms in LCSH, via the TS-SIS Law Funnel. This program will involve participants in the kinds of discussions in which the LCSH editorial board engages.

Sunday July 22, 2012 1:30pm - 2:30pm
HCC-Room 202

2:45pm

3:45pm

C1: Searching Legal Opinions: The Google Scholar Approach

Target Audience: Technical services librarians, public services librarians, information system managers, database managers, library directors

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will tour the key features of Google Scholar’s search service for legal opinions and journals.
2) Participants will discover indexing problems with legal collections and the approaches Google Scholar has adopted to solve those problems.

Google Scholar has recently implemented an extensive database of U.S. case law. Legal professionals, law students, and other users can find and read the decisions that govern their lives. Google Scholar is not only used by students, faculty, librarians, and researchers, it is also used by professionals in many large law firms. For the first time, one of the founding engineers of Google Scholar, Dr. Anurag Acharya, will join AALL to share the approaches taken to meet the challenges of legal materials. Dr. Acharya will present Google Scholar’s search service for legal materials, describing and illustrating key features. He will also explain how Google approaches problems specific to indexing legal collections. The program will conclude with a 30-minute question-and-answer session.

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 210

3:45pm

C2: Launching into RDA: The New Frontier

Target Audience: Technical services librarians, administrators

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will benefit from hearing about other law librarians’ real-life experiences with RDA and will learn how to successfully implement Resource Description Access (RDA) in their libraries.
2) Participants will be able to assess the impact of RDA implementation on their online library catalogs.

Three U.S. national libraries are expected to implement the new cataloging code, RDA, beginning January 2013. Law catalogers who participated in the RDA testing process and training during the fall of 2010 and the spring of 2011 described their experiences at “The TS-SIS Hot Topic program: The RDA Decision and What It Means for Me and My Library!” in Philadelphia in 2011. The two law libraries represented at that program have decided to implement RDA well before the U.S. national libraries do so. Law catalogers from those libraries will share their experiences transitioning from AACR2 to RDA, and discuss the impact on workflow, productivity, OPAC displays, and information retrieval.

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 306

3:45pm

C3: Law Library Collections Post-Microform: Future Implications for the Newest Legacy Format

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in microform collection management and access

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to describe the current status of microform-produced, law-related materials and the availability of microform equipment.
2) Participants will be able to compare options for managing and accessing microform collections.

For nearly a century, microform has provided compact storage of non-binary, human-readable information, allowing libraries to efficiently and effectively increase their collection size and variety of topical content. Recently, the production of microform and microform reading equipment has plummeted, but the quality of digitization from microform has vastly improved. Microform is becoming a legacy format, and libraries must decide what to do with their collections. This program will examine the current status of the production of law-related materials on microform, availability of microform equipment, and digitization of existing law-related microform materials. Additional discussion will cover the options for managing microform collections, as well as access to print and microform-based information in the next decade, including storage and preservation, scanning and digitization equipment, access methodologies, and user services.

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 302

3:45pm

C4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law – Part II

Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze a research problem in terms of the legal system, the human rights issue, and the appropriate treaty.

2) Participants will be able to identify and apply the knowledge of the appropriate institutional source, the stage in the institution’s process at which the relevant information/document is likely to be found, and the type of document that is most likely to have the information needed to solve the problem.


Part II of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to do research on difficult problems in the Council of Europe, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Inter-American Human Rights Commission and Court. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the European and American Human Rights agreements; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the those treaties; and the unique documents that they produce. Upon returning to their institutions, participants will be able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 312

3:45pm

C5: Hot Topics in Copyright for Librarians

Target Audience: All librarians who deal with copyright issues

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to explain their obligations and opportunities for using copyrighted materials.

2) Participants will be able to identify high-priority copyright issues at the federal and state levels that impact law librarians.

Law librarians are often the go-to professionals for copyright issues and questions.  Whether we are evaluating the copyright issues of documents we need to use, seeking permissions, determining fair use, applying the Section 108 copyright exemption for libraries, or just answering everybody’s question of “Can I copy/scan/email/post/route this?”, copyright impacts our professional lives on a day-to-day basis.  The digital revolution has complicated copyright by allowing forms of copying and distribution that were unheard of in the analog era.  Keeping up with this ever-changing world is a particular challenge.

In a unique format, the Copyright Committee is presenting a series of short presentations on three hot topics in the copyright world.  The first will focus on locating owners of copyrighted materials.  A law librarian and practicing attorney will provide tips and suggestions for locating elusive owners of copyrighted “orphan” works.  The second presentation will look at copyright coverage of state and local government documents.  While virtually all federal documents are in the public domain under 17 USC Section 105, this federal law does not apply to the states, leaving states with various approaches.  Speakers will highlight the skills for determining if a particular state document may be covered by a copyright.  The final presentation will look at the most recent developments in copyright legislation and litigation, including the ongoing Google Books and Georgia State University lawsuits, recent suits claiming copyright protection for court briefs and “prior art” in patent claims, and the latest in the copyright piracy (SOPA) debate in Congress.

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 311

3:45pm

C6: Attorney-Client Confidentiality and the Law Librarian

Target Audience: Librarians who support attorneys, comply with privacy laws, do licensing, and provide reference; IT staff

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn about attorney-client confidentiality requirements relating to legal research.
2) Participants will be able to apply confidentiality compliance techniques to licensing, reference, and some IT support for attorneys and judges, as well as clinical law faculty and students.

Attorney-client confidentiality is challenged by cloud computing, passwords that identify database users, vendor advertisements that identify subscribers, employer access to employee email, Internet Service Provider and web tracking access to online research activity, and some uses of social media. A Boston attorney with expertise in confidentiality and privacy law will outline the scope of ethical and legal requirements for attorneys and for the librarians and IT staff who support them. Participants will receive tips on how to support compliance with confidentiality requirements. A significant portion of the presentation will be devoted to audience questions in order to address specific concerns of those attending.

Organizers/Presenters
Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 304

3:45pm

PLL-SIS Program: The New "A" Team: Library and Marketing

Target Audience: Librarians who want to increase their value and visibility within their firm

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn tips for collaborating with the marketing department as well as the benefits it brings for both departments.
2) Participants will be able to identify best practices for streamlining and organizing workflow between these two departments.

For librarians who have seen a need for competitive intelligence (CI), or who have been charged with setting up such a program, this panel discussion will provide practical tips on how to work with not only attorneys, but also your firm’s marketing and/or business development team to make it happen. Mark Gediman saw that opportunity at Best Best & Krieger, and convinced his executive committee and CMO to work with him to develop and launch the program. Louella Randall was charged with creating a CI program at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan. After hiring John Jackson and embedding him in the business development area, Randall, Jackson, and Senior Director of Client & Practice Development Kelly Williams Rike have worked closely together to improve and streamline the research process. Hear a lively discussion that will leave you with advice and insights about the process that you can use at your own firm.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for John L. Jackson

John L. Jackson

Business Research Librarian, Sutherland Asbill & Brennan
I moved into business research at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan in Atlanta after 14 years as a research librarian at two major daily newspapers. I am passionate about helping my firm grow by offering genuine insights into companies and industries worldwide.

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 207

3:45pm

Diversity Symposium on Cultural Intelligence: Are You Culturally Competent? (sponsored by LexisNexis)

Target Audience: Librarians looking to increase their knowledge and understanding of cultural intelligence (CQ) and its importance in the workplace

 

Learning Outcomes: 
1) Participants will learn what cultural intelligence (CQ) is, and why it is important to know your own CQ.

2) Participants will learn how cultural intelligence is being used in the legal profession, and why it is helpful for librarians to be aware of its impact on libraries.

 

This program will discuss an overview of cross-cultural management through cultural intelligence (CQ) for developing global librarian leaders. A majority of research indicates the importance of emotional intelligence. It is only recently that cultural intelligence has surfaced as an additional characteristic of global leaders. Libraries, clients, business partners, and resources are becoming more global.  It is essential that librarians recognize the challenges of performing in an international work environment. There is a growing reliance of global resource-sharing in library services that encourages stronger global collaboration. Key questions addressed in this program include: Is cultural intelligence required for librarians to have effective cross-cultural management in a global environment? What is cultural intelligence? How does cultural intelligence impact an organization and enhance a librarian's value?  What are the challenges of performing in a global environment for librarians? A panel discussion of experts will discuss these issues and offer suggestions for success in global times.

Organizers/Presenters
MA

Michele A. Lucero

Director of Business Development & Recruiting, LAC Group

Sunday July 22, 2012 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Sheraton-Fairfax A

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5:15pm

PLL-SIS Intellectual Property Group Vendor Panel

Information providers will field questions from the moderator and audience as they discuss their products and organizational vision as it relates to IP information, research process and analysis.

 

Moderator:  Jeff Bois, Foley & Lardner

 

Panelists:  

 

Gary Cummins, FIZ on behalf of STN

Steve Kriston, Thomson Reuters

Audrey Marcus, ProQuest Dialog

Mike Hudelson, LexisNexis

Christophe Marchisio, Questel Orbit

Owen Byrd, Lex Machina

Sunday July 22, 2012 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Sheraton-Hampton AB

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5:30pm

A Twilight Tour of Salem

The Witch Trials of the 1690's and the China Trade Era are the two major historical events that made Salem famous. You'll walk through its charming streets, with a local guide exploring the sites and stories of Salem's unusual history. Your tour will include a walk down Chestnut Street which has been called the "most distinguished street in America." It is the area where the sea captains of the China Trade Era built their beautiful federal style homes. Your visit also includes a walk by the famous House of Seven Gables and the Witch House, a war memorial and private homes that range in architecture from the late 1600's to the mid 1800's. Your guide will create a portrait and an understanding of the legacy of the witch trials, and how this chapter in Salem's history influenced the city for generations to come.

A delicious seated dinner will be served at Capt’s Waterfront Grill and Pub, overlooking the harbor after the tour’s conclusion. This is an event that cannot be replicated anywhere else but in Salem, and will be remembered as a special and unique experience!

Sunday, July 22
Approximate Timing: 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
 
Cost: $125.00 per person, based on (25) guests - Book this tour

Included Features: Round trip transportation via Mini coach, services of a tour guide, specialized twilight tour, complete 3 course dinner with (1) glass house wine/beer, taxes and gratuity
* Menu to be determined

Sunday July 22, 2012 5:30pm - 10:30pm
Salem

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