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Monday, July 23
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

Thomson Reuters Meeting with SCCLL Leaders
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:15am
Sheraton-Berkeley B

7:00am

ALL-SIS Directors Breakfast (directors only)

Ticketed event: $53.00; advance registration required by June 29.

Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Independence Ballroom West

7:00am

ALL-SIS Middle Managers Breakfast (sponsored by William S. Hein & Co., Inc.)

Ticketed event: $25.00; advance registration required by June 29.

Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 8:30am
Sheraton-Back Bay Ballroom A

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

PLL-Fastcase Hospitality Suite

Please come relax and network with your colleagues and enjoy a morning coffee and danish, afternoon snacks, light hors d'oeuvres or a nightcap from 7am – 11:00pm in the Fenway Suite # 2807.

Monday July 23, 2012 7:00am - 11:59pm
Sheraton-Fenway Suite (Room 2807)

7:15am

7:15am

7:30am

8:15am

AALL/ILTA Program: Partnering with IT

Target Audience: Library managers and directors; technical services librarians; research managers; library staff responsible for implementing software and/or working with vendors to implement online services

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to provide IT with the information they need to facilitate a smooth implementation of a product or online service, as well as provide IT with proper requirements for any custom development work that the library needs.

2) Participants will strategically examine the skills of the library staff in order to describe them in a way that will resonate with technology executives.

Sometimes it seems as if librarians are from Venus and technologists are from Mars.  This highly interactive session will explore two aspects of partnering effectively with IT.  Learn how you can position the library to play a strategic role in firm technology initiatives and be a savvy consumer of IT services.  A CIO for a large firm will talk about how his world changed when the library was added to his areas of responsibility, what his world is like now, and what he looks for in partners on technology initiatives. A director of knowledge management and library services at a large law firm will explain how the librarian’s skill set brings value to technology projects. Learn strategies to position the library as a "go-to" resource for technology projects, such as enterprise search, intranets, precedent collections, and mobile technology.  A panel of IT professionals will candidly discuss how to get the support you need for building a custom application, integrating data from your library systems into your portal, or implementing commercial products on the firm’s network.  This is your chance to ask the questions you would love to pose to your IT colleagues. A glossary of technical terms, a checklist for implementing software, guidelines for developing a requirements document for a custom database, and other tips will be provided so that you are well prepared when asking IT for help with a project.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Keith Schultz

Keith Schultz

Keith Schultz is the Director of Information Services at Brown Rudnick LLP [brownrudnick.com]. He oversees the firm's business systems, records management, Web site, e-Discovery & application development.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:15am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 312

8:30am

ALL-SIS Program: A Teachable Moment: The Relevance of Results Using Digests and Citators in Westlaw and Lexis

Target Audience: Teachers of legal research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the differences in the relevance of results generated in the citator and digest functions in Lexis and Westlaw.
2) Participants will be able to create classroom demonstrations and exercises that illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of intermediated searching and purely computer-generated searching.

This program will discuss empirical research into the differences in the results obtained from database searches using primarily intermediated systems (West's headnotes and key numbers) or primarily computer-generated systems (Lexis's Topics and More Like This Headnote). The program will also examine the search results from using Shepard's and Keycite, where each system utilizes a different algorithm. The visible difference in results can be used to illustrate how variable search results are in different databases. Recommended teaching methods for using this data to assist students in understanding the benefits and limitations of computer-assisted and human-assisted searches will be shared.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:00am
HCC-Room 206

8:30am

D1: The Innovative Interfaces/SkyRiver vs. OCLC Lawsuit: Who Wins? Who Loses?

Target Audience: Library managers and system librarians with responsibility for the selection and implementation of integrated library systems; librarians interested in vendor practices and the automation marketplace; librarians interested in the future of library automation

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the major issues in the lawsuit and how it may impact the library automation marketplace.
2) Participants will be able to identify some of the major trends influencing library automation.

The SkyRiver/Innovative Interfaces lawsuit against OCLC for monopoly practices has potentially wide-ranging impact for the law library world. These two major automation players, whose business interests were formerly in separate worlds, are now in direct competition. While OCLC has long been the primary bibliographic utility for copy cataloging, SkyRiver has recently become a new vendor supplying bibliographic records to libraries. And while Innovative Interfaces has long been the provider of integrated library systems (especially for law libraries), the development of Worldcat Local and Web Management Services by OCLC makes it a significant player in this market, too. This program will present the facts surrounding this lawsuit, what it may mean for libraries, and some projections for the future of library automation.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 309

8:30am

D2: Linked Data, Law Libraries, and the Semantic Web

Target Audience: Law librarians interested in extending the reach of their catalogs

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand how linked data in our current catalog records can impact user searches.
2) Participants will understand the basic structure of Resource Description Framework (RDF).

Catalogers and systems developers might appreciate the potential of the Semantic Web, but it is difficult to see how a library’s catalog data can be linked in. Diane Hillmann, John Joergensen, and F. Tim Knight will provide an overview and live project examples of how Resource Description and Access (RDA), Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), and Resource Description Framework (RDF) can push libraries’ records onto the web and extend catalog functionality.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 302

8:30am

D3: The Law of the Salem Witch Trials

Target Audience: Librarians and researchers interested in the historical development of law and the use of early American legal research sources, both in print and online

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain how 17th century Anglo-American courts reconciled supernatural beliefs and the rule of law.
2) Participants will be able to locate primary and secondary historical legal sources on early American witchcraft trials using print and electronic sources, including publicly available databases of pre-Revolutionary materials.

In 1692, 20 people from Salem Village, about 10 miles north of Boston, were killed during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. While the trials are often portrayed as arbitrary, they actually followed very strict rules that had been developed over centuries. Librarians from the Jacob Burns Law Library, which has an extensive collection of materials on witchcraft trials, will look at the substantive and procedural laws regulating witchcraft trials in the late 17th century, how they came to be, and how they were applied in the Massachusetts Colony during the Salem trials. The identification and use of primary and secondary legal history materials will be discussed, including formerly scarce materials that are now widely available electronically.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 306

8:30am

D4: Access to Justice Committees and the Growing Importance of Law Librarian Involvement

Target Audience: Law librarians who serve pro se litigants and need to understand the role of statewide committees that advance partnerships and strategies for enhancing access-to-justice initiatives at a policy/program level; law librarians who consider Access to Justice (A2J) committees as critical advocates for the preservation of library programs


Learning Outcomes:
1) Attendees will be able to describe the impact of A2J committees in the preservation of law library services.
2) Attendees will learn how they can connect with these committees in their respective states to expand the law librarian’s role in access-to-justice initiatives.

Engaging with key organizations can help law librarians broaden their base of support and increase their effectiveness. This program will give an overview of A2J committees around the country. Participants will learn how the committees work and about their importance for the preservation of law libraries and access to legal information.  Very few law librarians are currently members of A2J committees, but law librarians who are A2J members in Washington and Maryland will describe the ways their committee connections strengthen partnerships with courts, legal aid organizations, and bar associations. Speakers will explain how connections to A2J committees help promote law libraries and how they create mutually beneficial opportunities to expand A2J. A short question-and-answer period will invite audience participants to offer input regarding their local A2J and advocacy efforts.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 304

8:30am

D5: Law Library Research Assistant Programs: Two Different Models

Target Audience: Library directors in academic law libraries; public services librarians who teach or provide faculty services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to assess the potential for expanded faculty service at their law school libraries, explain the benefits and potential drawbacks of using each of the predominant models of library research assistant (RA) programs, and identify institutional factors essential to the success of such programs.
2) Participants will learn how to design a library RA program that supports institutional objectives and fits the staffing and funding profile of their particular library.

A law library research assistant (RA) program can enhance a library’s value and market librarian skills within the institution, while expanding the teaching role of librarians. A library RA program promotes faculty recruitment and retention by providing skilled and accountable research assistants to law faculty. Two predominant models of library RA programs exist in U.S. law schools, and administrators of these programs get many inquiries from other academic librarians who are interested in starting their own programs. Law librarians representing the two models will explain the distinctions among their programs and the factors that make their models successful.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 210

8:30am

D6: Making Sense of Canadian Legislation

Target Audience: Librarians from any field who need to find and understand Canadian legislation

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and explain core Canadian legislative concepts to patrons.
2) Participants will be able to identify and explain Canadian statutory citations.

Have you ever looked a Canadian statute but didn’t understand how it was amended? Has your law firm recently retained a Canadian client? Have you ever had to find a Canadian statute but were left empty-handed? Are you just plain curious as to how your neighbors to the north draft, organize, and publish their legislation? If you said “yes” to any of these questions, this program is for you! At this session, you will learn about the differences between Canadian and American legislation, how Canadian legislation becomes law, how it is organized and published, and how it is consolidated. Three experienced Canadian law librarians will provide the introductory material you need.

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 311

8:30am

PLL-SIS Program: Technical Services by the Seat of Your Pants

Target Audience: Librarians who are handling technical services for the first time or who would like to learn more about this function of the library

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn what technical services work entails, and the competencies required to do it.

2) Participants will learn how seasoned technical services librarians manage these functions in a university, law firm, and government agency library, as well as how to implement efficient and successful technical services sections in their own libraries.

This program addresses the questions: What is 'technical services'? What do technical services staff do? What can I expect from them? What will my institution—university, law firm, or government agency—expect from the library's technical services department? How do I create and implement a successful technical services unit in my library when I have never done this type of work before?

A panel of experienced technical services librarians – representing a law firm library, a government agency, and a university library – will describe how they learned technical services, how they developed successful technical services workflows, and how they manage and train technical services staff. Additionally, these pros will discuss how to identify and address the critical issues of their type of institution, including budgeting, providing access to resources, and managing contractors.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Christine Korytnyk Dulaney

Christine Korytnyk Dulaney

Pence Law Library American Unversity
Christine Dulaney is currently Associate Law Librarian for Technical and Metadata Services at the Pence Law Library of American University in Washington, DC. In both her current position as well as in her previous position as Head of Technical Services in at the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress, Christine has managed staff reorganizations as these library collections transitioned from print to online formats... Read More →

Monday July 23, 2012 8:30am - 9:45am
HCC-Room 207

9:00am

9:00am

Daily Paper-The Hub

The Hub, AALL’s daily conference paper, will help keep you informed during the 2012 Annual Meeting. Published for the four days of the conference (Saturday–Tuesday) in print—plus two electronic editions—it will feature articles of interest to those attending the meeting, including program and meeting announcements, articles about featured speakers, and helpful advice from selected librarians from around the country. Also featured will be information about the Boston area, including articles on historical sites, cultural events, tours, and dining.

Be sure to check our blog The Hub-Bub regularly, too, for news and updates about conference happenings in our host city.

Interested persons wishing to submit articles or other information to the Hub should send them to Joan Shear at Boston College Law Library.

• Articles for the electronic preview edition must be received by June 7.
• Articles for the first print edition must be received by July 9.
• Onsite, the deadline is 1:00 p.m. for the next day's edition.

Monday July 23, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
HCC-Room 209

9:00am

Placement Office

The AALL Placement Committee is proud to offer online job and candidate searching as part of the Placement Office at the AALL Annual Meeting and Conference in Boston. Posting through the AALL Career Center offers many benefits to employers and job seekers. Best of all, you don't have to be in Boston for the AALL Conference, and you don't even have to be in the Placement Office to take part in the action!

http://www.aallnet.org/conference/more/placement-services

Monday July 23, 2012 9:00am - 5:00pm
Sheraton-The Fens

9:45am

Meet the Candidates for the AALL Executive Board

Candidates for the 2012 AALL Executive Board election have been announced - "Meet the Candidates" is your chance to get close and personal with them! Come meet and mingle with the candidates for vice-president/president-elect, treasurer, and the AALL Executive Board. Take advantage of this opportunity to become better informed about the candidates before the November election. Come with your questions and find out what each candidate plans for the future of your Association.

Monday July 23, 2012 9:45am - 10:45am
HCC-Exhibit Hall-Level 2

9:45am

10:45am

CS-SIS Program: Enhancing Your Library's Web Presence with HTML5

Target Audience: Electronic services and web development librarians

Learning outcomes:
1) Participants will assess and analyze trends in web development, including usability and accessibility.
2) Participants will be able to identify aspects of their current websites that can benefit from HTML5 and implement appropriate code.

HTML has been the basis for structuring and presenting content on the web for 20 years. The current revision, HTML5, promises to dramatically increase the functionality of web documents and web applications. Even though HTML5 is not slated for recommendation until 2014, many of its features can be implemented now. These features include: semantic tag elements, easy multimedia support, interactive form inputs (that don't require JavaScript), and mobile device integration. Focusing on how implementation of HTML5 features can increase the usability and accessibility of library websites, this presentation will include a live demonstration of many HTML5 elements. Attendees will leave prepared to develop their own HTML5 content.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 207

10:45am

E1: State Advocacy Strategies: Learning to Connect, Grow, and Survive

Target Audience: Law librarians battling to safeguard public law library service against proposed state budget cuts that—should they become reality—challenge its very existence

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will identify alternative advocacy strategies devised by public law librarians (state, court, and county) aimed at preserving their operations in hard economic times.
2) Participants will be able to select, from among these alternative strategies, a blended advocacy plan—drawing elements from other states, but tailored to fit their own unique jurisdictions.

Faced with hard economic times, state governments are pinching savings from every budget line-item, often at a huge cost to public service. Protecting law libraries in such an environment requires a coordinated strategy. Unfortunately, there are 50 states, each with its own unique context. No single “master plan” fits all. Sharing experiences can, however, show what works—and what does not work—in particular circumstances. Such knowledge enables each individual to profit from the collective experience, extracting those elements that forge a productive local strategy. This program will constitute a culminating event built through speaker-structured conversation in the AALL Members Only section of AALLNET. This continuous online discussion—interactive and always current—fosters strategy-sharing in distinct, volatile environments. All speakers, networking from process inception until the Annual Conference, will draw from this raw material a strategic paradigm: a menu of alternatives that, in some combination, may prove useful anywhere. It is expected that this process, presently targeted for 2011-2012, will be ongoing. Building collective strategies never ends. It progresses from year, to year, to year.

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 210

10:45am

E2: Engaging and Educating the Screen Addicts of 2012

Target Audience: Librarians looking for ways to enhance their digital presence among patrons, especially through the use of custom-made instructional modules and digital media

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the latest trends involving patron learning habits, especially with regard to technology and digital media.
2) Participants will explore the process of creating library instructional guides that are tailored for today’s users, using two different methods—a purpose-built design and LibGuides; participants will understand the challenges and successes of each method.

This program will explore the depth of student engagement with digital media, specifically how to manage and deal with information-complacent patrons through new methods of engagement within instructional materials. Two librarians will share their case studies of how they incorporated digital media tools into their instructional materials in an effort to engage today’s tech-savvy patrons, and will also inspire participants to incorporate digital media into their own instructional materials and library guides by showcasing an exemplary librarian-created product, Lawbore, (http://lawbore.net/) and its sister site Learnmore (http://learnmore.lawbore.net/). The speakers will then provide participants with ideas and tips on how the average librarian with limited resources and IT knowledge can create his or her own digital media-enhanced products using tools such as LibGuides.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Emily Allbon

Emily Allbon

City University London
Based in London, UK I'm interested in everything associated with law, learning and technology. I developed the Lawbore website back in 2003 for the law school at City University London and it's been going strong ever since! Now features include a legal skills wiki, Learnmore and Careers blog, Future Lawyer. Looking forward to speaking at AALL for the first time since 2006!

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 302

10:45am

E3: Seminoles and Gators: Can Shared Patron-Driven Acquisitions of E-books Overcome the Rivalry?

Target Audience: Collection development librarians, acquisitions librarians, catalogers, and systems librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to negotiate a shared patron-driven e-book acquisitions plan that meets the needs of individual institutions.
2) Participants will be able to identify and evaluate opportunities for inter-institutional collaboration in e-book collection development.

This program describes the experiences of two state university law schools that joined forces to craft a shared patron-driven acquisitions program with a common vendor. Building a shared e-book collection among the state university libraries in Florida has been talked about for some time, though budget cuts and reorganization have prevented it from becoming a reality. Forced to look at creative ways to maximize acquisitions budgets, the law libraries at Florida State University and University of Florida worked with Ingram Coutts to adopt a shared PDA plan for legal monographs. By combining resources, the libraries were able to provide their users access to far more titles than would have been possible with individual plans. In this presentation, each school will discuss working together and with the vendor to create a shared profile, how they were able to exclude titles already owned or preferred in print, and how the PDA dovetails with each school’s collection development goals. They will also share how the plan impacted their individual budgets, workflows, and library management systems, as well as how it was received by users. A representative from Ingram Coutts will discuss the challenges and benefits of developing a single PDA plan that would meet the individual needs of two separate law schools. How these rival schools came together and whether they are still partners in this effort will be presented by three players on this unlikely team.

Organizers/Presenters
EG

Erin Gallagher

Collections Consultant, Ingram Coutts
Erin Gallagher is a Collections Consultant for Ingram Library Services, a leader in distribution, print-on-demand, and academic library services.  Erin's coverage area includes the Southeastern US and Atlantic Canada, where she partners with academic libraries to build and maintain Approval, Slip, and Patron-driven profiles.  She joined Ingram in 2010 after completing her M.L.I.S. from Florida State University.  While at FSU... Read More →

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 304

10:45am

E4: Digitizing Legal History

Target Audience: Librarians interested in digital libraries and digitizing government documents

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the steps involved in building a subject-based digital library.
2) Participants will be able to describe how to curate a digital collection of historic legal documents.

This program identifies the steps involved in building a digital archive of litigation documents related to the Mt. Laurel cases, a series of groundbreaking cases on affordable housing in New Jersey regarded as the state law equivalent of Brown v. Board of Education. Just as Brown forced the “American dilemma” of race onto the national political agenda, the New Jersey Supreme Court used judicial power to put the “political third rail” of suburban housing equity and affordability before legislators and governors who would have preferred to ignore the problem. Speakers will explain the basics involved in a successful digitization project, including selection, funding, digitizing documents, cost management, metadata, workflow, quality control, website design, the use of open source software, digital preservation, and publicity.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 306

10:45am

E5: Scanning the Future: QR Codes in Law Libraries

Target Audience: Individuals responsible for teaching, outreach, and marketing at their libraries; individuals interested in incorporating Quick Response (QR) codes into their workflow

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will assess the usefulness of QR codes for their libraries.
2) Participants will be able to create QR codes and incorporate them into instructional and marketing materials.

QR codes have been rapidly increasing in popularity. Companies and libraries alike use them to connect people with online information when and where they need it. They can be used to link physical and electronic resources and to direct patrons to up-to-the-minute information about library services. The presenters will discuss why their libraries chose QR codes over competing formats, how they have made use of these codes, and pitfalls to avoid when implementing QR code programs. They will also teach participants how to create QR codes and integrate them seamlessly into instructional and marketing materials. Participants will have the tools necessary to evaluate whether QR codes are right for their libraries and to develop innovative uses that meet their patrons’ needs.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Anna Russell

Anna Russell

Anna is a Reference and Electronic Resources librarian at the University of San Diego Law School since 2011. Her particular interest is in electronic legal resource authentication, preservation, and sharing. She enjoys working with patrons to seek out legal data from the online environment. In the rapidly changing age of digital information, Anna seeks to provide patrons with the most efficient tips and fun tools for online legal research.

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 311

10:45am

E6: Growing Beyond the Four Walls of Your Library into Strategic Knowledge Management

Target Audience: Law library directors, managers, and supervisors looking to extend the scope of responsibilities to enterprise knowledge management

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand what “knowledge management” (KM) is and grasp the benefits and challenges of adopting KM strategy.
2) Participants will understand the roles law librarians can play in portal deployment at law firms and examine case studies of KM projects lead by law librarians.

The program will cover what “knowledge management” is and the types of knowledge in law firms that require KM strategies and solutions. A demonstration of several KM projects will show the role law librarians play in leading KM initiatives. Librarians will understand how to go back to their firms to propose KM projects. The session will conclude with a discussion of the benefits/ROI and challenges involved in developing a KM enterprise strategy so that law librarians can develop a business case to get their KM initiative approved.

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 309

10:45am

FCIL-SIS Program: Roman Law Interest Group Presents, "Connecting Roman Law Books: Commentaries, Marginalia, Bookplates, and More"

Target Audience: Anyone interested in early legal and publishing history or a serendipitous intellectual interlude

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn about the role that printers played in developing law.
2) Participants will learn how authors, teachers, and collectors used books to learn, connect, and grow the law.

How do books learn, connect and grow? Marginalia, bookplates, page layout, and publishing history give clues to what authors, teachers, publishers, printers, readers, and collectors did to develop the field of law from ancient times to modern. Join our discussion with your favorite book connection.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 205

10:45am

OBS-SIS Program: Hot Topic – Are E-books the Future?

Target Audience: Anyone interested in future information technology trends in libraries

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify current information technology issues in libraries.
2) Participants will be able to identify at least one future trend in information technology in libraries.

Join this discussion about the impact of e-books in libraries. How will this trend affect collection development, budgets, and staffing? Will the introduction and use of e-books lead to greater patron satisfaction? What will libraries need to do to prepare for this new format?

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 206

10:45am

RIPS-SIS Program: Connect with Patrons by Creating Strong Research Guides

Target Audience: Librarians who create or update research guides


Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to identify best practices for managing and creating research guides.
2) Participants will be able to select the appropriate type of research guide for their patrons' needs.

The advent of online technologies has led to an explosion of available research resources, making the efforts of librarians to direct users to the best sources more critical than ever. One of the ways libraries can meet this need is by creating and updating online research guides for its users. This session will cover best practices for preparing these guides--including the initial decision to develop a guide in a particular area or of a particular type--the steps taken to create it, and how to markets a guide’s use once completed.

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 11:45am
HCC-Room 202

10:45am

AALL/ILTA Program: iCan! Empowering Librarians with iPads and Other Mobile Devices

Target Audience: All librarians who are interested in technology leadership

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to identify new opportunities and roles for law librarians as the use of mobile devices and iPads continues to grow in the legal workplace. 

2) Participants will learn about features and apps for iPads and other mobile devices that are useful for lawyers and law librarians.

Lawyers expect their mobile devices to connect at their workplace, and many now have iPads for personal use.  Law students use smartphones to access resources and expect to use iPads in the classroom. Some law firms and courts have embraced the iPad as their mobile tool of choice.  How does the law librarian fit into this picture?  Hear from a law firm director of library and research services who stepped up to answer the question many attorneys ask upon receiving an iPad:  What am I supposed to do with this?  Discover a variety of lawyer- and law student-friendly apps for accessing firm and law school library resources, performing online research, and increasing productivity of iPads and various other mobile devices.  An academic law library administrator will also describe the role his library staff played in developing and publicizing to the law school community a multi-platform smartphone app for accessing key library services. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the mobile device world and be better able to engage in conversations about the iPad’s place in legal settings. The session concludes with audience questions.

Organizers/Presenters
KH

Karen Helde

Director of Library, Research & Records Services, Lane Powell PC

Monday July 23, 2012 10:45am - 12:00pm
HCC-Room 312

11:00am

Social Law Library - John Adams Courthouse

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation: Attendees should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the group using public transportation.

Established in 1804, Social Law Library is one of the oldest law libraries in the United States and one of the oldest civic and cultural organizations in Boston. Social Law Library is located in the beautifully renovated John Adams Courthouse, the seat of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and the Massachusetts Appeals Court. This tour will detail the collection strengths and services of the Social Law Library.

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.

Monday July 23, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm
Social Law Library - John Adams Courthouse

12:00pm

Past President's Luncheon
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner A

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

Annual Meeting Program Committee 2013 Open Forum

The 2013 Annual Meeting Program Committee invites you to the AMPC Open Forum to learn about the program proposal and selection processes. 

 

Be sure to take a moment to complete a brief survey to let the AMPC know what kind of programming you'd like to see in Seattle next year: http://www.cvent.com/d/5cq1kd.

Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Sheraton-Gardner B

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

Thomson Reuters Luncheon for Government and Academic Librarians
THIS EVENT IS BY INVITATION ONLY
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 300

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

FCIL-SIS Program: The Executive Committee Presents, "The Recipient of the FCIL Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians"

Target Audience: All AALL members

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the legal culture and legal information environment of a foreign country.
2) Participants will be able to identify key resources for legal research in a foreign legal jurisdiction.

The recipient of the 2012 FCIL Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians will discuss how to best understand and examine the legal system, legal information environment, and law libraries of another country.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 205

12:00pm

LHRB-SIS Program: "Digging" Legal History in Boston: The Case of the Boston Strangler

Target Audience: Librarians and researchers interested in learning the uses of modern forensic science techniques and exhumation to prove legal historical facts; librarians and researchers who wish to learn about the forensic developments in the Boston Strangler case that changed the face of this crime

Learning outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to assess the role of modern forensic science techniques and exhumation in re-examinations of historical legal events.

2) Participants will be able to explain how forensic techniques unavailable during the 1960s produced evidence 36 years later indicating that the publicly accepted identity of the Boston Strangler may be a mistake.

The person lodged in the public consciousness as the Boston Strangler never stood trial for the murders of 11 women in the Boston area from 1962 to 1964. Although defense attorney F. Lee Bailey obtained the confession of Albert DeSalvo, no physical evidence linked DeSalvo to the killings, and his versions of the killings did not harmonize fully with the facts. James E. Starrs, Professor Emeritus of Law and Forensic Sciences at George Washington University Law School, led the team that performed the exhumation and re-autopsy of Mary Sullivan, the Strangler's purported last victim, and DeSalvo, both at the request of the families. Starrs returns to AALL to discuss the forensic evidence obtained during re-examination, and how this evidence destroyed the credibility of DeSalvo's claim to be the Boston Strangler.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 12:00pm - 1:00pm
HCC-Room 206

12:00pm

12:30pm

1:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (1:00 p.m. bus tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 1:00 p.m. tour will include motor coach transportation (transportation fee applies).

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

$10.00; advance registration by June 29 is required.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

1:15pm

AALL/ILTA Program: Current Awareness – Delivering the Right News at the Right Time

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are responsible for distributing information throughout their law firms

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to evaluate the current awareness needs of their firm.

2) Participants will be able to identify solutions for organizing and delivering information in their firm.

"Infobesity" doesn't begin to define the current awareness problems facing legal professionals today, but there are new and evolving ways to meet the challenge of getting the right news to people in a less disruptive manner.  Librarians and technologists can team up to find creative and effective ways to locate a good source, sift through it for relevant content, curate it, consolidate it with other sources, organize it, and deliver it in a variety of ways to reduce the interruptions and distractions caused by too-frequent emails and alerts. This program will help librarians evaluate the available tools to make informed decisions.  Case studies will illustrate solutions in action, including ways to include internal content, and what mobile options can and cannot do.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 312

1:15pm

CS-SIS Program: Hot Topic: E-books

Target Audience: Librarians who want a deeper understanding of e-book technology

 

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will identify the software tools required to convert content into e-books.

2) Participants will compare various publishing options for distributing e-books.

 

Tom Boone, Reference Librarian at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, and Jason Eiseman, Head of Technology Services at Yale Law Library, will discuss emerging trends in e-books. This session will include an in-depth look at the technology, tools, and techniques for creating, editing, and publishing e-books in various formats for various platforms. See real-life examples of e-book creation and publishing by law libraries.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 202

1:15pm

F1: Lost in Translation: Immigration Detention and Access to Legal Materials

Target Audience: All librarians interested in greater access to legal materials

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to connect with nonprofit organizations working to improve access to legal materials for immigration detainees.
2) Participants will be able to identify the obstacles to library access for immigration detainees.

In 2010, approximately 363,000 foreign nationals were held in civil detention in the United States. About half of the detainees were held in privately run prisons. Unlike those who have been charged with a crime, they have no right to free legal counsel and do not have the same access to legal materials that are enjoyed by those who are charged with or have been convicted of crimes. The speakers will describe the current state of access to legal materials for immigration detainees, identify the ABA nonbinding standards for access to legal materials, and inform participants of efforts in the library and legal communities to improve access to legal information for persons in immigration detention.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 210

1:15pm

F2: Law Firm Libraries: Your E-book Future Has Arrived

This session will be webcast from Boston on AALL2go (member login required).


Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are directors or managers; technical services, electronic services, and reference librarians; academic librarians interested in knowing what law firms are doing with regard to e-books

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to analyze and utilize the information provided to evaluate e-book formats for use in their organizations.
2) Participants will be able to analyze and utilize the information provided to assist them in creating e-book policies for their organizations.

With little fanfare, LexisNexis has begun offering some content in e-book format (e.g., the color books such as the Redbook New York Civil Practice Law and Rules). Thomson Reuters has indicated court rules for New York and others will be in e-book format in the fourth quarter of 2011. The ABA and Apple have entered into a partnership to publish legal e-books for sale in the Apple bookstore. Visions of attorneys waving their Kindles and iPads in front of our faces demanding e-books have begun to haunt our dreams. So many questions come to mind: What will the functionality be like? How will updates work? Will attorneys want both print and e-book formats, and what will that do to our budgets? What happens when an attorney leaves, along with e-book content paid for by the firm? A panel of two firm librarians who have conducted e-book trials, and two vendors will talk about this experience, as well as what vendors are doing with regard to functionality, pricing, and administration.

 

Law firm librarians are encouraged to complete this survey in advance of the program.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 306

1:15pm

F3: Boston Best Friends Forever: A Collaboration Story

Target Audience: Academic librarians, library directors, collection development librarians, acquisitions librarians, etc.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will learn how to develop successful collaborative efforts with libraries in their local area.
2) Participants will learn how to partner with other libraries to maximize access to resources and realize efficiencies.

The Boston Academic Law Library Consortium (BALLCO) is a joint undertaking to coordinate access, maintenance, and housing of law-related titles among the members of the group and to provide for expedited access to those sources as requested by the other members in this local geographic area. A panel from the six participating Boston-area academic law libraries will share their collaborative efforts to optimize their respective resources and to provide their users timely access to a wide range of legal materials. The panel will discuss the group’s efforts from inception through planning and implementation.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 309

1:15pm

F4: Helping Others Learn, Connect, and Grow Through Times of Stress

Target Audience: Librarians, library managers, library administrators, department heads

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will discover ways to balance personal issues with professional communication when dealing with other employees.
2) Participants will explore techniques that are utilized by a professional social worker, for dealing with sensitive staff issues.

Over the past few years, personal staff problems seem to be on the rise. Library employees are dealing with anxiety, depression, divorce, financial difficulties, and other issues which affect their productivity and ability to concentrate. Managers may find themselves spending extensive amounts of time coaching employees with personal problems at the expense of working through specific job duties. Good managers, like good counselors, understand the issues and needs, both professional and personal, of their staff. They also know how to help and motivate staff through difficult periods. Participants in this program will explore effective techniques, utilized by social workers, for counseling others who are going through difficult personal issues. Join us in a lively discussion with a librarian and social worker as we discuss, and role play real staff issues and explore effective techniques for resolving them.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 304

1:15pm

F5: The Diplomat Librarian: Working with LLMs, International Scholars, Students, and Faculty

Target Audience: Academic law librarians working in schools that have LLM students and international visiting scholars; firm librarians who support overseas offices

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify the pedagogical and research needs of international students and faculty, and explain how they differ from those of traditional JD students.
2) Participants will be able to apply techniques that address the differences, challenges, and synergies of working with an international patron base.

This program will address common questions and concerns that law librarians have when dealing with international members of the law school community in the library, the classroom, and the academy. Speakers will discuss their own experiences working with these populations and will offer best practices for dealing with language issues, different legal education cultures and perceptions of librarians and libraries, and issues arising from having patrons trained in a different type of legal system. Participants will develop an increased understanding of common issues that these unique populations present and will also receive ideas on how they can better engage this patron group in the library’s activities.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 302

1:15pm

F6: Lessons from the Snail Darter: The Relationship Between Wildlife Law and Economic Development

Target Audience: Academic law librarians; law librarians in firms that specialize in environmental, international, and/or land use planning law

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will examine the U.S. and international body of law affecting economic development projects where wildlife may be endangered.
2) Participants will consider the legal context in which conflicts arise between protection of wildlife and economic development projects.

The inevitable conflicts between economic development and wildlife protection are complicated and emotional. The social impacts of cases like the “snail darter case” and events like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill highlight the controversy that often surrounds crucial economic development and equally important wildlife protection. In the 30 years since TVA v. Hill, these clashes have continued both at home and abroad. Professor Zygmunt Plater, who litigated the “snail darter case” and has written and spoken extensively on the case in the past three decades, will present and analyze the body of law and ramifications that grew from that case.

Organizers/Presenters
ZJ

Zygmunt J. B. Plater

Land. Air. Water. Wildlife. And trying to sustain Humanity in all its richness on the planet it threatens.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 311

1:15pm

OBS-SIS Program: Local Systems Roundtable – What Does the Next Generation System Look Like?

Target Audience: OBS/TS-SIS members, other interested law librarians

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to describe problems and solutions addressed by their colleagues.
2) Participants will be able to identify how peers with limited budgets creatively leveraged these resources and improved their systems. 

Join in a discussion about the development of the next generation library systems. What are the trends of the new library systems being developed by Ex Libris, III, Serials Solutions, and others? What is the current stage of development? When will these systems be deployed? What is the impact of these systems living in the cloud? How will the new systems change library staff workflows? Is open-source another option to be considered?

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 208

1:15pm

RIPS-SIS Program: Diversify Your Teaching Portfolio with Tutorials!

Target Audience: Librarians charged with developing and teaching legal information literacy to users: students, attorneys, and public patrons

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and compare free and proprietary software options, and utilize practical tips, templates, and samples for creating tutorials.
2) Participants will be able to select the best type of tutorial for their organization and targeted audiences, and subsequently execute the steps in the tutorial production process.

Today’s challenges of teaching legal information literacy include limited face time with users, demanding millennials who want more than lectures, and the introduction of new and changing research interfaces. Creating web-based tutorials is one way to address these challenges while, simultaneously diversifying your teaching portfolio. Tutorials can be instructional, reinforcing, and/or assessment-focused. Discover the components of three types of tutorials and the best practices for ensuring your tutorials are tailored to the learning needs of your particular audience. Also learn about the various free and proprietary software options for creating tutorials. To assist in the tutorial production process, participants will be provided with tips and cautions, templates and samples, sources for multimedia content, and a selected bibliography of sources about creating and utilizing tutorials.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 207

1:15pm

TS-SIS Program: The Accidental Archivists: Lessons Learned from a Digital Archive Project

Target Audience: Library managers; technical services librarians; any librarians who are interested in digital archive projects

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify and discuss the major issues involved with creating a digital archive.
2) Participants will be able to develop an action plan for creating a digital archive in their own institutions.

In July 2011, the University of Colorado’s William A. Wise Law Library received a large and unexpected donation of print materials when former dean and prolific scholar David Getches passed away. The library’s small staff, which had limited experience with archives or digitization, suddenly became “accidental archivists,” with a mandated goal to create a digital archive of selected materials from the donation by April 2012. This program traces the development of the project from initiation to completion, and provides a practical case study of what to expect when a library undertakes a digitization project for the first time. The presentation will focus on several key issues: establishing digitization processes and obtaining equipment; funding; gathering permissions; planning; staffing; and using outside sources of assistance.

Monday July 23, 2012 1:15pm - 2:15pm
HCC-Room 206

2:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (2:00 p.m. bus tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 2:00 p.m. tour will include motor coach transportation (transportation fee applies).

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

$10.00; advance registration by June 29 is required

Monday July 23, 2012 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

2:45pm

AALL/ILTA Program: SharePoint as a Showcase for Library Resources and Knowledge Repositories

Target Audience: Law firm librarians who are responsible for building awareness of resources and services; librarians who have an interest in building upon existing technical skills to create collaborative solutions

Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will gain perspective on basic features of SharePoint, such as no-code development and taxonomy/metadata management.

2) Participants will examine case studies,which include solutions that librarians have developed to meet the business needs of their organizations, and gain ideas for how they can do the same.

Join library and knowledge management (KM) professionals who are responsible for architecting solutions in SharePoint to explore a variety of ways to bring value to your firm/organization.  Find out why SharePoint is so powerful and easy to learn and use for creating custom pages without coding experience.  Panelists will explain how SharePoint 2010 "thinks like a librarian" in utilizing features such as taxonomy/metadata management services.  They will also provide examples of how librarians are directly involved with intranet development, not only in creating research pages, but also in creating team sites to increase efficiency for collection envelopment, lateral onboarding/orientation, and general project/task management.  Additionally, client extranets and the value librarians can bring to these projects will be discussed.

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 312

2:45pm

CS-SIS Program (roundtable): "What's it All About, Techie?" Does Educational Technology Help Law Students Learn the Law?

Target Audience: IT/educational technology librarians, law firm librarians, and other librarians who are interested in the effectiveness of technology in law classes

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will discuss whether educational technology improves law students’ comprehension of legal subjects and helps prepare them for the modern practice of law.
2) Participants will discuss appropriate implementations of effective technologies in teaching legal concepts.

Technology has been an important part of legal education for many years now, but does technology ultimately help students to “learn the law”? In this roundtable, participants will discuss whether technology improves students’ comprehension of legal subjects and helps to prepare them for practice. The participants will also share their own experiences and discuss best practices.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 300

2:45pm

Distinguished Lectureship Address by Award Winner Anne Klinefelter: Should Librarians Retire the Privacy Ethic?

AALL's Ethical Principles include a duty to respect confidentiality and privacy.  AALL's Government Relations Committee promotes USA PATRIOT Act amendments to strengthen library users' privacy.  And AALL's Principles for Licensing include requirements that database vendors protect privacy.  Librarians in general are widely known as leaders in privacy advocacy. 

 

But can we really protect library users from being tracked individually by database producers, search engines, websites, and mobile reader devices?   And does government access to this collected data undermine our PATRIOT Act advocacy?  Should librarians retire the privacy ethic and instead embrace the content, customization, remote access, cloud efficiencies, collection control, and safety benefits we can now purchase with privacy? 

 

Do you think librarians should protect the confidentiality of library use?  AALL members are encouraged to vote (Yes/No/Not Sure) before the Annual Meeting in anticipation of Professor Klinefelter's address.  Comments are optional, and you can vote anonymously or not.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 208

2:45pm

G1: Chinese Law – Real Time!

Target Audience: Law librarians who have Chinese law research demands

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify major government organs in China, the different types of documents produced by those organs, and the legal relationship between those documents.
2) Participants will be able to explain how to locate Chinese legal documents as soon as they are promulgated, and will compare the respective timeliness of Westlaw China, Lawinfochina, Isinolaw, and other commercial and government databases.

This program will identify major government organs in the People’s Republic of China that promulgate laws and regulations, the different types of documents produced, and the legal relationship between those documents. Participants will focus on learning how to locate these documents as fast as they are enacted. Participants will also identify leading Chinese secondary sources in cutting-edge areas. Additionally, the session will compare the timeliness of different databases, including Lawinfochina, Westlaw China, Isinolaw, and official Chinese government websites.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 210

2:45pm

G2: Turner v. Rogers, Due Process, and the Pursuit of Court Access: Trumpeting the Law Library Connection

Target Audience: Librarians interested in interpretation of this historic U.S. Supreme Court decision and the law librarian’s role in access to justice; librarians who serve self-represented litigants, especially those with civil matters

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to explain the impact Turner v. Rogers has on due process requirements for the unrepresented.
2) Participants will be able to identify new ways that law library services contribute to meeting the courts’ access standards.

Turner v. Rogers (131 S.Ct. 2507) is a 2011 decision that calls for fundamental fairness and access to the courts in civil cases. “Civil Gideon” champions the right to counsel in civil cases. Law librarians can unite with Turner as a landmark case in the delivery of legal services to the unrepresented. The Turner case offers a new perspective for advocating the library’s role in access to justice services. The program will conclude with a dialog on how law librarians might implement the Turner principles.

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 302

2:45pm

G3: The Best of Both Worlds: Blending Online and Face-to-Face Learning in Teaching Legal Research

Target Audience: Academic librarians who teach legal research

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to design a basic blended learning course utilizing in-person class sessions, webinars, and online course management software.
2) Participants will be prepared to identify and assess at least five different integrated learning techniques to actively involve students in learning legal research.

ABA Rule 306 has permitted law schools to offer distance education classes for some time, and students increasingly enjoy the greater convenience of online courses. Legal research classes are emerging as key areas of potential innovation for law schools testing out online and blended courses. Librarians have a unique opportunity to take the lead in pioneering new ways of teaching in this new learning environment. Panelists will draw on their own experience of creating and teaching conventional, online, and blended legal research classes to review what has worked and what hasn’t. This session will include discussion of webinars, online course management systems, in-person sessions, and integrated learning techniques that actively involve students in mastering the concepts of legal research.

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 304

2:45pm

G4: Antitrust Considerations and the Association

Target Audience: Librarians with responsibility for library administration and/or legal information purchasing decisions

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will understand the history of the Federal Trade Commission guidelines related to legal information resources and of the antitrust discussion within AALL.
2) Participants will be able to identify the challenges posed by current antitrust law on association activity, while also identifying strategies for effective collective responses to unfair licensing and publishing practices.

Join in this practical exploration of how antitrust issues relate to associations, led by Shaun Esposito, CRIV Chair 2011-2012.  Stephen W. Armstrong, Senior Counsel and chair of the Antitrust Practice Group at Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads, LLP, will provide a brief overview of antitrust concerns relevant to professional organizations.  AALL Vendor Liaison Margaret Maes will briefly summarize the “AALL and Antitrust FAQs” recently published on AALLNET, with Armstrong providing commentary and analysis of the FAQs.  Esposito and Maes will then take turns presenting fact scenarios to Armstrong based upon activities that AALL members and leadership have identified as key challenges facing associations when considering action at the organizational level.  Audience members will then be invited to ask questions or present fact scenarios of their own for consideration.

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 306

2:45pm

G5: Preserving Our Digital Heritage: A Conversation with Jason Scott

Target Audience: Librarians interested in computer history or who would like to learn digital preservation techniques

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to list several hurdles to preserving digital objects.
2) Participants will be able to identify steps they can take personally and professionally as librarians to help preserve digital objects.

Jason Scott has been an “armchair archivist” since 1998 with the Archive Team and Textfiles.com. He has recently become a professional archivist and works with the Internet Archive to preserve pieces of our digital heritage (e.g., discontinued social networking sites). In this free-form lecture and interview, Scott will discuss his trials and tribulations in this quest for preservation, as well as offer suggestions for steps that information professionals can take to preserve their own data and that of others. Connections will also be made between preserving “general” data and the problems with preserving law and other materials published on the Internet.

Organizers/Presenters
avatar for Sarah Glassmeyer

Sarah Glassmeyer

Center for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction
JS

Jason Scott Sadofsky

I am a digital historian. I speak at cons, make documentaries, run a few websites, and bring a little tear to your eye of years gone past.

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 309

2:45pm

G6: PIPEs, Bear Hugs, and Big Boy Letters: Revealing Corporate and Securities Terms of Art with an In-Depth Look at PIPEs

Target Audience: Librarians who want to know more about securities terms; librarians who do financial research and need to know about Private Investment in Public Equity (PIPE) transactions


Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to recognize and understand new securities terms and how they were developed.
2) Participants will be able to understand how and why PIPE transactions are used as a financing vehicle, and how to identify resources and methods for researching PIPEs.

Corporate and securities terms of art evolve as labels to identify complex mechanisms, which can be difficult to understand without knowing how the terms evolved and are used by securities and corporate attorneys. The first part of the program will cover the meaning behind some of these terms of art. The speakers will present and explain Big Boy Letters, Bear Hug Letters, a Greenshoe, a Wells Notice, and additional terms.

The second part of the program will focus on PIPEs: how they are used by companies as a financing device and how librarians can find information about them. PIPE transactions have become an increasingly important financing vehicle for many public companies, and in 2011, PIPE deals raised more than $27 billion in financings. As a consequence, librarians who work for law firms with private equity clients are being asked to research PIPE deals. This part of the program will describe for participants the PIPE market and why PIPE financings are used. Participants will also learn about online tools that librarians can use in researching PIPE transactions. The program will conclude with a discussion of search strategies for using these resources.

Organizers/Presenters
DF

Daniel F. McLaughlin

Senior Research Librarian, Weil Gotshal & Manges

Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 311

2:45pm

OBS-SIS Program: OCLC Users Roundtable

Target Audience: Anyone who uses OCLC services

Learning Outcomes:
1) Participants will be able to identify at least one new or enhanced OCLC product or service, and assess if that product or service could be used within their library setting.
2) Participants will be able to identify at least one future development in OCLC products and services, and assess if that product or service could be used within their library setting.

OCLC provides a diverse and ever expanding and developing range of products and services (cataloging, ILL, discovery platform, library management services, etc.) to the library community. Learn about OCLC’s new and enhanced services, as well as planned future developments, directly from an OCLC representative. Following this overview, the bulk of the program time will be allotted to audience member questions and a chance to share comments, ideas, and concerns about OCLC products, RDA records, services, and best practices with the speaker and other OCLC users in the audience.

Organizers/Presenters
Monday July 23, 2012 2:45pm - 4:00pm
HCC-Room 205

3:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (3:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 3:00 p.m. tour does not include transportation. Participants should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

 

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.

Monday July 23, 2012 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

4:00pm

Harvard Law School Library (4:00 p.m. tour)

***This tour has reached capacity.***

Transportation:The 4:00 p.m. tour does not include transportation. Participants should arrange their own transportation; conference volunteers will be available to guide the groups using public transportation.

The Harvard Law School Library is the largest academic law library in the United States. Established in 1817, the library has continued to reinvent itself. Come take a walking tour of the library to learn about the library’s most recent changes – as they relate to collections, use of space, and innovations in service.

 

There is no charge for this tour, but advance registration is required.

Monday July 23, 2012 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Harvard Law School Library

4:15pm

AALL General Business Meeting and Members Open Forum

Resolutions submitted by AALL members prior to July 2 may be considered by the membership at the Business Meeting. During this year’s Members’ Open Forum, which immediately follows the Annual Business Meeting, the AALL president and other officers will be available to respond to member questions regarding AALL and its programs and activities. In addition to accepting questions from the floor, members can also submit questions in advance of the meeting.

 

To submit a question in advance for this year’s Open Forum, email: ambusmtg@aall.org.

 

The Hall of Fame Awards and Presidential Certificates will be presented at the Business Meeting.

Monday July 23, 2012 4:15pm - 5:30pm
HCC-Ballroom B

5:30pm

5:30pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

5:45pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

6:00pm

Beacon Hill and Public Garden Evening Tour

From the golden dome of the State House to the elegant homes of Louisburg Square, this Beacon Hill tour moves along picturesque streets highlighting examples of the architect Charles Bulfinch and his followers. Learn the story of Beacon Hill, from its rural beginnings to the visions of the Mount Vernon Proprietors while walking among this historic collection of Federal and Greek Revival row houses. A walk through the shaded streets of Beacon Hill offers a pleasant repose from a hot summer’s day. Follow your guide through the Boston Public Garden to visit all the major sculptures and monuments in the area. The Public Garden, established in 1837, is the first public botanical garden in the United States. Today, with its plant material chosen for ornamental excellence as well as its botanical diversity, it forms a green and flowering oasis in the heart of a great metropolis. No visit to Boston would be complete without a stroll in the Garden which is maintained by the Boston Parks and Recreation Department in cooperation with the Friends of the Public Garden.

Monday, July 23
Approximate Timing: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
 
Cost: $45.00 per person, based on (25) guests - Book this tour
 
Included Features: Round trip transportation via mini coach, services of a tour guide, all taxes and gratuity
 
Please Note:
This tour includes a good deal of walking on cobblestone streets. Please wear comfortable walking shoes.

Monday July 23, 2012 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Beacon Hill

6:00pm

6:30pm

6:30pm

6:30pm

6:45pm

6:45pm

 




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